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Last update:
October, 2019

2019 UWC Scholarship Recipients

The University Women’s Club is proud to award 6 scholarships to returning CU students for the 2019-2020 academic year. These students will be celebrated at the Scholarship Luncheon, April 16, 2019. Many many thanks to the scholarship committee: Lauren Charbonneau, Sydney Hoerler, Boyce Sher, Sherry Woodruff, and Merry Bullock (Chair).

UWC scholarships are supported by the generous donations of UWC members and friends! Donations are always welcome

Janeena Blackman

Janeena Blackmam

Janeena Blackman’s resourcefulness has made the difference in her life and in the lives of her family. When her mother was disabled, at age 10, she asked herself who is going to cook a meal for the nine children in her home. How will the laundry get done? Who will take care of her mother? She answered all these questions by doing it herself. She makes things happen for herself working eighty hours a week every summer. A Dean’s List student, a junior at CU, and majoring in Psychology with plans for a Masters and PhD. She is drawn to Forensic Psychology and Industrial Organizational Psychology. She is drawn to helping people live up to their potential and to giving back.


Allie Carpenter

Alexis (Allie) Carpenter


Alexis (Allie) Carpenter left the familiarity of West Virginia, where she was briefly married, and attended community college, to find new opportunities and challenges. While passing through Colorado on an exploratory trip westward, she set her sights on CU Boulder. She moved here, found a job as an assistant in a veterinary hospital, and began her studies last summer discovering an interest in human psychology and animal behavior that she hopes to combine into a satisfying and meaningful career. Allie continues to work 40 hours a week at the vet clinic, and takes  15 hours of credit toward her degree, which means intense class days on two days of the week and long shifts at the clinic on the others. When her schedule allows, Allie volunteers at the Boulder Food Pantry. She is most appreciative of the UWC scholarship because it will enable her to reduce her reliance on student loans to pay for tuition.


Jace Haehlein

Jace Haehnlein

Jace Haehnlein reminds us of how education saves lives. Not only did it transform his life from drug addict to a 3.75 student at CU Boulder, but it inspired Jace to choose a career to help transform other lives for many years to come.  When other teenagers were enjoying high school, Jace, at 14, was fighting a battle with methamphetamines that led him to run away from home at 15 and come close to ending up in prison. When he faced the judge who would determine his fate, Jace reached deep into his heart to declare his intent for a better life. He entered a residential treatment facility for three years, then moved to the Community College of Denver where he was a top student and received the Presidential Service Award for work with Psi Beta Honor Society and the community. Jace plans to work in the Peace Corps and get a masters in Social Work. He knows what it takes to help heal others who have been hurt and is himself  a shining example of how there is always hope if you are open to seeing and seizing it. 


Rajesh Rajchal

Rajesh Rajchal

Rajesh Rajchal immigrated to the USA from Nepal, and embarked on a long journey to complete an education.  His goal is to manage natural resources scientifically, contribute to a healthier quality of life for all, and continue his life-long passion for nature. Rajesh’s journey has not been smooth – he has battled cancer in his young son (now recovered) and in himself, and struggled with his extended family to recover from a devastating earthquake in his home country of Nepal that destroyed his parents’ home. Throughout these struggles, Rajesh maintained his passion for learning and motivation to excel at his studies. He will be the first in his family to earn a college degree. As he notes, acknowledgement of his progress through a UWC scholarship is a strong motivator to excel in his academic journey.


Ruby Rendon

Ruby Rendon

Ruby Rendon is a fighter, a mother, wife, and strong student. She relied on persistence, hard work, determination and a positive attitude to begin her educational journey, and now applies that same strength to complete her education, care for her family, and nourish a son diagnosed as an infant with autism. “My son defines who I am, he is my story” said Ruby, as she proudly described his integration into kindergarten, delight in playing sports, and outreach to new friends. Ruby , who is getting a degree in speech therapy, hopes to continue to graduate work in speech and audiology. An ardent advocate for kids and others with learning challenges, she works in the CU disabilities office, and volunteers to help those with disabilities have access to educational materials and opportunities. Ruby is gentle and forceful – as a first-generation student, from a distressed childhood, now with a family and its significant challenges, she exudes a spirited optimism that, with determination and education, promises can be kept.


Sheena Skinner

Sheena Skinner

Sheena Skinner believes that climate change is the biggest issue our world currently faces.  She left a lucrative job in order to pursue a career in which she would be a part of the solution.  At CU Boulder she is a geology major with an emphasis on environmental geology.  Her volunteer work includes being a tutor for geology students and networking with researchers to bring seminars to faculty and students. She has participated in many service projects, but singles out Denver GIVES for the joy it brings to underprivileged children.  She works as a Teaching Assistant for a Harvard University online class that enables over 200 students to learn geology. Sheena will be the first from her family to earn a college degree.  After graduation her goal is to continue on to graduate school to do research on carbon capture, storage and sequestration in sedimentary formations.  She hopes to join the community of scientists who will eventually solve our climate problems.